coupe

The Polestar One is a fabulous car – a Volvo, to be precise

Polestar looked at classic Volvo models for inspiration for its new car

IT SOUNDS like something that Gerry Anderson might have conjured up with a couple of string-assisted pilots in mind.

The Polestar One has a name that conjures up images of a machine powered by nuclear reactors and piloted by one of the Tracy family at four times the speed of sound, but in fact this vaguely sci-fi name’s been given to a car, and one that isn’t the normal motor show flight of one-off fancy. It is, according to Volvo, going to be slapped on the back of a fully-fledged production model that’ll be tootling along our streets in about two years’ time.

But it isn’t just the name that’s a bit Blade Runner. This two-door coupe is an electric car backed up by a tiny petrol engine, but with the equivalent of 600bhp on tap it’s easily a match for BMW’s similarly configured i8 supercar. It’ll also only be available to order online and you won’t actually be able to buy it – you subscribe to it, like you would a magazine.

The new arrival also marks the arrival of a new car brand in its own right. To most car nuts Polestar is the Swedes’ answer to what BMW does with its M cars and the magic Mercedes rustles up with its AMG saloons and sports cars, but apparently Polestar is rather more than that. Which is why the new model is going to be followed up by the imaginatively-titled Polestar Two.

Which is a mistake, I reckon. I love the Polestar One’s eco-friendly-yet-exciting take on driving fun and its clever double rear axle. I especially love the way it looks – which is unmistakably like a Volvo.

Specifically, you can tell it borrows plenty of styling cues from the old P1800 so beloved of Simon Templar in The Saint, and beneath those swooping curves it’s based on a Volvo platform too. Yet no matter how hard I peer at the press photos I can’t see the ‘V’ word stamped anywhere on the new arrival, which is a shame. Maybe if they’d launched it when all of Volvo’s cars were styled by toddlers using Etch-A-Sketch toys I’d understand the Swedes being a bit hesitant about launching a Volvo sports car, but these days things are different.

I sincerely hope the Polestar One not only arrives here on time, but does it shouting proudly about its Scandinavian heritage too. It is the coolest car Volvo’s ever made.

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The Hyundai Coupe is Korea’s first classic car

P1040529IMAGINE being able to buy a Ford Capri 2.8 Injection for just £350.

That’s exactly what an old friend of mine did 15 years ago – and I bet he wishes he’d never sold it on. Fast forward to 2016 and this fast Ford easily commands another zero on the price he paid. Another two zeros, if it’s a really low mileage minter and recent auction prices are anything to go by.

Yet that £350 price – what you might pay for a weekend away on the continent or a half-decent garden shed, don’t forget – is where the Hyundai Coupe all too often resides these days. At the time of writing there’s a chap up the road from me flogging his for that sort of money, and it’s tricky not to get tempted.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not for a second suggesting a slightly shagged Hyundai is going to get the same sort of cult following that’s driven Capri prices up to the point where they cost the same as a new 3-Series sometime in the early 2030s. But I do reckon it’s one of the two-door contenders to watch out for, because I can’t think of a stronger claim for the case of being Korea’s first card carrying classic.

Think about what else Korea was offering us snobbish Brits when the first-generation Coupe landed here in 1996. The Kia Pride, for instance, or the Daewoo Espero. Miserable motors with all the charisma of an industrial park in Derby, and while they were cheap and reliable they did absolutely nothing to stir the soul. Even the outgoing Scoupe didn’t exactly give the likes of Fiat’s Coupé and the Vauxhall Tigra sleepless nights.

Yet out of nowhere there was this swoopy two-door with snazzy alloy wheels and Coke bottle curves tempting us onto Hyundai’s forecourts. There was even a rally version, and Hyundai capitalised on its two-doors appearances in the Formula 2 class of the World Rally Championship with its F2 and F2 Evolution models in the late 1990s.

And yes, I know Hyundai might have dropped the ball a bit at the turn of the millennium with one of the most cack-handed facelifts ever devised, but it picked it right up again when it brought out a second-generation model which managed to shrink everything that was right about the Ferrari 456GT.

Neither model had anything like the Capri’s cult following – in which case I’ll point you in the direction of Ford’s Puma, which is equally bargain basement right now – but it’s hard to deny the Hyundai Coupe was a great car.

You might laugh now, but I honestly reckon this is as cheap as Korea’s first genuine classic is ever going to get.

hyundai rally car